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The Importance of Trained Adult Leaders

An educated, well trained leadership team is essential for success within any organization. Scouts BSA is no different. Coming back from the local council education day I noticed a few things…

#1. The more successful troops/packs in the council had representatives of their units there at the training day, taking classes and learning.

#2. Scouters there had a vested interest in educating others as well as furthering their own education because they want to be better and make scouting better as a whole.

#3. The message was clear and consistent from several instructors and speakers throughout the day. That message was scouts and scouters need to be trained on how to deal with both success and failure. How to learn from it and prepare for the next challenge.This is impressive because the instructors didn’t share notes between themselves beforehand. This is what scouting is all about and all those instructors get it.

For a lot of people, failure is something to be avoided like the plague. “It’s too risky to allow someone to fail.” If you have trained adults/scouters who have been given the expectation that failure is a natural occurrence and that some of the most needed wisdom comes out of it, then you have a prepared group of adults ready to take it on when it happens. They will also know how to turn a lot of negatives to positives from the experience. They educate their scouts on understanding that failure is ok as long as you learn and become better because of it. Their best classes are given when their scouts see the adults go through failure and come out the other side better for it. Louis Pasteur once said “Fortune favors the prepared mind.” I like a derivative of it… “Luck favors the prepared”.  I think he was spot on. It’s the educated and trained leader that recognizes the right opportunities, from the good and bad experiences, and makes it happen for not only himself/herself but for their unit too. #ScoutsBSA

Good luck out there scouters!

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The author, Tony Zizak, is a long time scouter, Eagle Scout, and the scoutmaster of Troop 119 Ellettsville, IN. He has been to scout camps across the country and was a certified Program Director, Aquatics Director and a Scoutcraft Director. As a youth Tony received his Vigil Honor and served as a Lodge Chief for Tseyedin Lodge #65. Reach out to him for any questions you may have on this article.

 

About the author: tzizak
Tony Zizak is a long time scouter, Eagle Scout, and the scoutmaster of Troop 119 Ellettsville, IN. He has served on Wood Badge staff as a Troop Guide. He has been to scout camps across the country and was a certified Program Director, Aquatics Director and a Scoutcraft Director. As a youth Tony received his Vigil Honor and served as a Lodge Chief for Tseyedin Lodge #65. Reach out to him for any questions you may have on any of his articles posted

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